Calypso

Calypso

Rating: 3.5/5 | Calypso was delightful. I listened to the audiobook, actually, which I love to do with nonfiction because the author usually reads it. Listening to Sedaris read his books is especially fantastic, and this one was no different. To parrot what literally the entire rest of the world says, he is hilarious and very real. (Click the post to read more.)

Nevertheless, She Persisted: True Stories of Women Leaders in Tech

Nevertheless, She Persisted: True Stories of Women Leaders in Tech

Rating: 3.75/5 | This was a really interesting book with a great concept. Gluckman, who works in the tech industry herself and found herself really waking up to the gender issues within it, set out on a mission to interview some tech powerwomen. (Click the post to read more.)

Uncensored: My Life and Uncomfortable Conversations at the Intersection of Black and White America

Uncensored: My Life and Uncomfortable Conversations at the Intersection of Black and White America

Rating: 5/5 | Zachary Wood is an impressive person. He wrote his memoir like he lives his life: free of judgment, open to interpersonal connection, assertive but not aggressive, and with plenty of room for the reader to maintain his or her dignity and opinion. He seeks to understand, to connect, to challenge assumptions, and to broaden both his and his readers' understanding of the world. (Click the post to read more.)

Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in 40 Questions

Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in 40 Questions

Rating: 5/5 | Tell Me How It Ends is a short, concise, but hard-hitting work of literary nonfiction. It made me think about an issue that I haven't let myself think about to deeply, and it humanized it more than numbers and statistics ever could. This will only take you a few hours to read. Do it. (Click the post to read more.}

New Power: How Power Works in Our Hyperconnected World—and How to Make It Work for You

New Power: How Power Works in Our Hyperconnected World—and How to Make It Work for You

Rating: 4/5 | New Power was a fascinating look at one of the many ways the world is changing. It offers a study of "old power" vs "new power" and suggests ways they can be used strategically together to help effect positive change. The old vs. new dichotomy is straightforward and makes a complex situation easier to understand. They also picked great examples to help illustrate their points. (Click the post to read more.)

The Myth of the Nice Girl: Achieving a Career You Love Without Becoming a Person You Hate

The Myth of the Nice Girl: Achieving a Career You Love Without Becoming a Person You Hate

Rating: 3/5 | They Myth of the Nice Girl was a quick read with some actionable tips, and I'm glad I read it. Fran Hauser is articulate and comes across warmly, and she has done her homework when it comes to backing up her points. At the end of the day, this book is one of those that takes a lot of things you probably know intuitively and puts them together in a way that feels useful and helps you steer your own actions. (Click the post to read more.)